How We Use Evernote to be a Better Learning Organisation

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I am sure most of you have read about how we first started using Evernote, and some great uses that we have discovered since using Evernote. I think the past 3 months have made some of us fan boys/girls of Evernote. With the help of our team, I’ve put together a short video of how Evernote has helped us become a better learning organisation!

If you use Evernote, do share with us how it has helped you in your workflow!

5 Ways Companies Are Using mLearning

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picjumbo.com_IMG_3642

Source: picjumbo.com

Companies are always searching for ways to engage their learners in training. These new ways are done with intention to ensure continued improvement of an employee’s work performance. Sometimes, we mistake training as just being a pass requirement, but simply having that mindset of merely passing a substandard training course does little to help the company in its business performance. Not only that, the medium of conducting these programmes is very important because it determines the instructional design of the course and how accessible it is to employees.

Lately, the industry has been going towards mobile learning technologies (MLT) as a result of growing mobile adoption for workers all around the world. Organisations are looking at providing more performance support in light of growing trends of data growth in every business, which highlights the need for employers to help their employees sieve through the avalanche of information to get to the most important ones that make the difference. Mobile Learning seems to be able to do that by providing employees what they need at their point of need. Definitely, this unique selling point has helped mobile learning to gained alot of traction in the training industry, especially in the retail and sales related businesses where accurate and up-to-date information is constantly needed.

Building upon the list from trainingzone, let us now take a look at how some companies are using mLearning for their organisations:

1. Video

Videos are an integral part of the mobile learning as it provides content that is engaging when delivered the right way. Videos are great for how-tos and in providing short bursts of content. In a 2012 research report on mLearning (ASTD), video was found to be the top 3 preferred formats for mLearning. These are videos used for courses, performance support, quick references, product updates, etc. It is also found to be highly effective as people have reported high levels of engagement in a poll of 300 training professionals by Brandon Hall.

2. Converting and pushing key documents

This is essentially performance support, where employees are able to dynamically access important and key information at the time and point of need. mLearning allows them the ability to do so because their devices are on them most of the time.

3. Supporting the blend

Most companies are still rather conventional and still prefer face-to-face training as their primary mode of delivery. However, they have also recognised the need for classroom time and the time out of classroom to encompass more interactive and engaging elements. Mobile is a good way to incorporate such elements. For example, learners could be using their mobile device to engage in a short quiz or poll during class and the results will be immediately available to the instructor. Not only that, trainers are able to “follow up” on learners to ensure that learners are applying what they learn in the classroom out of the classroom. An example is the app Gametize, which allows trainers to plan a series of challenges for their learners. For example, learners may have gone through a communications course and trainers could follow up on their progress by getting them to do challenges like speaking in front of a small group, or approaching a group of strangers to strike up a conversation.

4. On-the-go training courses and performance support for mobile workforce

The mobile workforce is the main target of mobile training courses and performance support as they are the profile of employees who need quick updates, up-to-date information, product specifications and more. Because of that, mobile learning is on a huge demand for this group. For that, I would recommend EDLE, our mLearning platform which allows you to create your own courses and performance support aids and deliver it to your learners in a matter of hours.

videocafe5. Social Learning

Social and collaborative learning is especially popular and the uptake is high as the workforce is already used to mobile devices as a means of maintaining social interactions with their family, friends and co-workers. An example of an extremely successful training programme is Video Cafe by The Cheesecake Factory. Employees can upload 2-3 min storytelling videos of “best practices”- how they prepare a particular dish, how they handle an angry customer..etc. With that, everyone in the company is able to watch, comment, rate, tag, and add their own video as well. This initiative proved very popular as their employees reported to have higher levels of engagement and were able to learn from their fellow employees rather than sitting through a long powerpoint presentation or a textbook.

So these are some ways that companies are using mLearning to enhance learning in the organisation. It might be note-worthy that these ways are pretty much aligned to the current trends in which our generation is learning- through youtube videos, using mobile apps for self-learning and using different forms of social media to get their information. Similarly, corporations will have to observe the ways in which the general population learns and see how to leverage on that in organisational learning.

If you have any other ways in which companies are using mLearning, do share with us in the comments below!

Customised Training Courses for Employee Development

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techthursday

Tech Thursday is a blog series where we feature industry people, corporate learners and trainers on their e-learning habits. It covers everything from the e-learning they do in their company to the one tech device they can’t live without. This thursday, we feature Tiffany, who works as a risk consultant in a multi-national accounting firm. She shares with us the kinds of programmes that her company has for its employees, and how she has benefited from the wide array of training programmes that it offers.

Hi Tiffany! Tell us a bit about yourself.

I am working as an Assistant Manager doing risk consulting in one of the main professional services companies. I’ve been in this industry for about 4 years.

coaching

Source: globaldreamsknoxville.com

What kind of training do you do in your company?

When consultants first join the company, they are given a week long training coordinated by the Learning and Development Unit. Basics of the role will be communicated to us via powerpoint slides as well as case studies to introduce an element of real life application. However, about 95% of what we need to know is taught via OJT (on-the-job training), as the work we perform requires us to be highly adaptable. Each project that we embark on requires us to understand and design risk profiles specific for that particular client. Personally I feel that learning from an experienced senior is a really good form of training.

What is the training for?

Training conducted is mainly for key skills required in our job scope. For example, report writing skills, product understanding and changes in the local regulations or the firm’s risk management developments.

I like the fact that I can choose from a myriad of training courses conducted so that I can customise my learning in accordance to my needs or interests.

How do you usually go through training?

For compulsory training, my firm will send emails to lead us to links to do training from slides.

For skills training, we are allowed to pick from a variety of course offerings. We will search for interesting or relevant courses through our company’s website and look at the training schedules. After signing up for these trainings, we will attend these half or full day face to face teaching sessions. Usually learning material is sent to us for pre-course readings. At the end of most of these face-to-face trainings, we will have a self assessment to reinforce our learning takeaways.

What do you like about the different forms of training that you have?

As a risk consultant, there isn’t a one size fit all type of training schedule as skill requirements differ from person to person depending on your strengths and focus areas. I like the fact that I can choose from a myriad of training courses conducted so that I can customise my learning in accordance to my needs or interests.

Other than the training provided by your company, do you actively seek out other ways to improve how you do your job? 

I will try to read the papers to keep up to date with happenings around the world. You never know when this type of information could come in handy in my course of work. Also, I use a simple app called Flipboard and on my way back from work, I will flip through the app’s ‘business magazine’ to see if there are any short interesting articles to read.

What kind of tech devices do you use?

I have a smart phone, my work laptop and my own personal laptop.

What is one device you can’t live without, and why?

I would have to say that I am unable to live without my work laptop. I find my outlook programme particularly useful to perform multiple tasks within the same platform. i.e. To schedule meetings, archive learning material sent through emails and last but not least, to keep myself constantly connected to my clients.

What is the one technology tool that has helped you a lot in learning? Why? 

It would be a difficult toss up between Google, the brilliant search engine and Wikipedia, the wonderful online encyclopedia. I literally spend hours on these two ‘oracles’ clicking on hyperlink after hyperlink, following an endless stream of semi-related topics.

And We Are Almost There..

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Edle mlearning2At work, we sometimes sieve through so much information just to get to that sliver of information that we once went through in our elearning module. We want information to be readily available when we need the performance support at work. We’ve got these knowledge stored away somewhere online, as a paper job aid, or in our minds. But most of the time, we just can’t find it.

That is why mobile learning matters.

Mobile learning approaches allow learners to access learning conveniently and flexibly. If your organisation has a distributed workforce, you don’t have to worry about not being able to schedule their employees down for regular training courses as mobile courses can be delivered fast and effectively.

Mobile learning enables teaching and learning to occur at the most appropriate time and place. That means that learners will get access to information just when they need to at their workplace. Your organisation will be able to provide adequate and effective performance support for your employees to work at their optimum.

At Epiphany, it has taken us months of research, planning, programming and countless iterations.. and EDLE: Mobile Learning is almost ready for the big launch on the 24 July 2014. EDLE allows organisations to build courses and performance support modules in a fast and effective way through its easy user-interface. Now, anyone and not just the L&D department can build these courses.

EDLE helps to

1) Shorten time to productivity – Every business wants to optimise their manpower and be able to train their employees in the quickest time as possible for optimum business performance. EDLE helps to do so by providing easy access for employees anytime, anywhere.

2) Increase effectiveness of training – Courses in EDLE are designed with objectives in mind and is split up into bite-sized chunks which allow learners to internalise content better.

3) Provide greater support for employees – Easy access and search allows them to access content at their point of need.

We’ve already did our soft launch this week by migrating our servers over to the new EDLE mLearning, but will still be working on it for a couple of days to optimise its performance. Meanwhile, sign up for a free EDLE trial now!

6 Interesting Mobile Learning Stats for Your Training Strategy

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picjumbo.com_IMG_3649Some of you may have been put off by the onslaught of learning with technology in the recent years. Technology in training may be helping Learning & Development professionals to mitigate the problems that face-to-face training face by bringing content online, but some may wonder about the effectiveness of the training itself. Lately, there has been news about mobile learning being the next in thing in the corporate training industry, and you wonder whether this is just going to be another new direction that you should contend with in your company’s training strategy just because of yet another fad.

I’ve recently come across some statistics about mobile trends on shiftelearning.com that may make you reconsider mobile as being “yet another fad”. If anything, the trend looks set to shift to great mobile usage in the general population in the long term.

1) Increasing mobile usage

91% of adults in the U.S now own a mobile phone. According to The Pew Research Internet Project Report from 2013, 63% of adult mobile phone users use their phones to go online, and this figure has grown by twice since 2009. This points towards the pervasiveness of mobile devices in everyday lives, and the central role that it holds for information access.

2) Increasing collaboration and engagement on the mobile

Learners are 2 times more likely to engage in collaboration, communication and peer-to-peer feedback on the mobile devices. They are also twice as much more likely to be listening to podcasts and watching videos as well. These statistics are taken from a study “Mobile Learning at Work” done in 2013.

3) Huge market potential for tablets

The sale of tablets is expected to grow by seven times from 2012 to 2016- from 56 million to 375 million units. This is according to a recent forecast from Forrester Research. Not only that, one-third of the sales will be businesses and two-fifths by emerging markets.

4) Increasing mobile workforce lead to rising mobile adoption trends

With the rise in mobile workers from 15% to 29% between 2011 – 2012 in the US and Europe, there are a huge number of organisations set to support such a trend. As this number increases, more mobile devices will be in use at work. (Source: 2013 Mobile Workforce Adoption Trends)

5) Mobile learning found to increase motivation

Studies have shown that mobile learning increases motivation and the willingness for self-assessment. In a study taken from The World Journal of Education, 70% of the students surveyed in this study reported an increase in their motivation to learn when mobile devices were used properly. 

6) Increasing number of Millenials entering the workforce

The Millenials- a generation who grew up with technology, are coming out into the workforce. Whether school or work trends are keeping up with such technology, the fact is that this generation is used to learning with the internet, more often than not with mobile devices. That is why institutions need to keep up with such a trend.

 

At the end of the day, it really isn’t about going with the trend of what the industry is currently into, but rather, what works best at this point in time for your consumers. Consumer’s tastes are constantly changing. And by consumers, I mean the employees who receive training from your company. What is the best way to allow them to consume training given their lifestyles, habits and preferences?

Even though training is going to be largely a mandatory one where employees go through the motion of learning what they need to know, in order for training to be effective and convenient for your employees, one needs to consider how they are used to consuming information.

And this rounds up my time here about mobile trends. What other data points towards mobile as being a trend that is here to stay? Do leave your comments below.

Building “Coaching Culture” Key For Effective Training

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techthursday

Tech Thursday is a blog series where we feature industry people, corporate learners and trainers on their e-learning habits. It covers everything from the e-learning they do in their company to the one tech device they can’t live without. This thursday, we feature David, who works in the audit department of a multi-national accounting firm. He shares with us the comprehensive training programmes that his company has and shares about the importance of a coaching culture and how it impacts employee performance.

Tell us a bit about yourself. Where do you work at and what is your designation?

I am David, and I am about to enter into my second year of work soon. I graduated with a double degree in Bachelor of Accountancy and a Bachelor of Business Management from the Singapore Management University. I currently work in the audit department of a multinational accounting firm. I specialise in the audit of financial services clients i.e Banking, Asset Management, Insurance companies.

What kind of training do you do in your company?

Firstly, as with most firms, my firm has an onboarding programme for new staff. Secondly, we also have e-learning sessions where we will cover mainly technical content. Last but not least, we have tons of on-the-job training, via the coaching by my seniors and managers.

 I am grateful to be in a firm which emphasizes a lot on a “coaching culture” and staff are encouraged to set aside time to guide their juniors.

How do you usually go through training?

For onboarding training, as accounting firms normally have large intakes, a workshop style programme normally takes place, and a full two weeks would be set aside. It covers both hard skills (revision of technical accounting knowledge), and soft skills (client management, learning how to be an effective team member). Such training “blocks” usually occur for every subsequent promotion of staff level.

For elearning sesions on technical content, this is done on an interactive learning platform where there will be case studies and continual assessments along the way.  At the end, there will be a final assessment to ensure that we are on all the same page.

I appreciate the fact that my company emphasizes on learning the soft skills as much as the hard skills. I think this is key in ensuring an all-rounded development of employees.

Source: CareerBright.com

Source: CareerBright.com

On-the-job training makes up the bulk of our training. I am grateful to be in a firm which emphasizes a lot on a “coaching culture” and staff are encouraged to set aside time to guide juniors through the auditing methodology of our firm, performing of audit procedures, and other important soft skills such as client management. I feel that such impartation of knowledge and skills is most effective as we get to experience first-hand instead of just learning from the classroom/textbook.

What do you like about the different forms of training that you have?

I appreciate the fact that my company emphasizes on learning the soft skills as much as the hard skills. I think this is key in ensuring an all-rounded development of employees. Also, the style of teaching is important. Having interactive workshop-styled sessions help to ensure participants remain engaged and retain the content being taught.

Other than the training provided by your company, do you actively seek out other ways to improve how you do your job? If yes, how do you do so?

I do my best to keep abreast of financial news (as my department specialises in the financial services sector), as well as accounting regulatory developments. This is via the papers I read, as well as the online resources that the company provides. I do own several useful accounting guides which have been with me since my university times; but I always have to ensure that what I read is updated, due to the fast-changing nature of accounting regulations these days.

What kind of tech devices do you use?

I own a laptop and a smartphone.

What is one device you can’t live without, and why?

I definitely cannot do without my trusty laptop. Most of my work is done on the laptop and the email is used very often for communicating with clients.

What is the one technology tool that has helped you a lot in learning? Why?

The internet, definitely. It is a convenient source replete with useful information. But of course, learning how to sift through what is and what isn’t useful, is equally important.

Managing OKRs in a Quarter with Moving Targets

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okrLast week, we introduced OKRs as a framework that our company has been undertaking for the past 2 quarters. Terence, the founder, also shared with us some things that he has learnt from setting company goals. This was followed by Sam, our content lead. In our last entry on OKRs, Jo, in charge of business development will be sharing their thoughts on using OKRs as a way to manage team and individual objectives!

 

joanneHi Jo! How has the OKRs helped you be more productive / goal oriented?

Hi. I think it really helps to have objectives planned every quarter as it gives a macro perspective of how I am positively contributing to the company. I treat goal oriented & productivity as the same thing because OKR is essentially goals that you set. By focusing on those goals, it helps you to focus your activities on productive things that help you to hit those goals.

While getting a 1.0 for OKRs sounds ideal, having too many 1.0s also means that the OKRs you set are not ambitious or broad enough.

How does it help you manage your day to day tasks? 

It helps me to filter my day-to-day tasks and to focus on those activities building up to my OKRs. I print out my OKRs and put them near me to remind myself that I should be focusing on tasks that help to reach those goals.

How does it help you to evaluate your own competencies and plan for the next quarter of OKRs?

The review process for OKRs is very interesting. While getting a 1.0 for OKRs sounds ideal, having too many 1.0s also means that the OKRs you set are not ambitious or broad enough. Ideally, we should be striving to set goals which are just a little bit out of reach to push yourself to do better. When I was reviewing my OKRs for the previous quarter, I realised that I had many “0″s because the OKRs that I had set out to do were no longer relevant given the directional changes that our company made during the quarter. That made me realise that in a certain season in the company where our targets might be constantly shifting, it may be good to review OKRs more often.

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Part 1: How to Use Google’s OKRs For Your Company

Part 2: 4 Things I’ve Learn from Managing Company Goals with OKRs

Part 3: Individual OKRs as Cascaded OKRs of the Company

Individual OKRs as Cascaded OKRs of the Company

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okrLast week, we introduced OKRs as a framework that our company has been undertaking for the past 2 quarters. Terence, the founder, also shared with us some things that he has learnt from setting company goals. In the following entries, some from our team will be sharing their thoughts on using OKRs as a way to manage team and individual objectives! First up, we’ve Sam, the content lead.

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samfamHi Sam. How has OKRs helped you be more productive? 

OKRs serve an important reminder that most of my time should be spent on productive work rather than busy work. When my daily activities are more aligned with my OKRs, that’s when I believe it helps with my productivity. It’s not always easy though. Sometimes when you get swept up in other things that need your attention, you neglect some of your OKRs. I learnt that I should set aside time to reflect on my OKRs and reassess the importance of some of them relative to other work. 

 I have learnt to reflect on the things that are relevant to the ultimate goals of the company, and plan my OKRs from there. 

How does it help you manage your day to day tasks? 

I don’t think it helps me manage day to day activities. However, it  helps to set the direction for the key goals I should accomplish within the quarter and the key tasks I have to do in order to achieve these goals. Some of these tasks don’t necessarily happen on a day-to-day basis, but certain periods during the quarter. 

What is one thing you have learnt from setting OKRs and how has that helped you to plan for the next quarter of OKRs? 

This is still a work in progress. The last time I wasn’t so sure of how to go about setting the OKRs and what were the specific steps involved to achieve the goals. I spent more time doing things unrelated to my individual OKRs, but interestingly enough these were things related to the company OKRs. It has helped me realised that I’ve got to plan my individual OKRs as cascaded OKRs of the company. For the next quarter, I have learnt to reflect on the things that are relevant to the ultimate goals of the company, and plan my OKRs from there. 

Part 1: How to Use Google’s OKRs For Your Company

Part 2: 4 Things I’ve Learn from Managing Company Goals with OKRs

Part 4: Managing OKRs in a Quarter with Moving Targets

Optimising Training to Maximise Business Performance

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techthursday

Tech Thursday is a blog series where we feature industry people, corporate learners and trainers on their e-learning habits. It covers everything from the e-learning they do in their company to the one tech device they can’t live without. This thursday, we feature Cheryl (not her real name), who works in a foreign bank as a Relationship Management Associate. She shares with us some thoughts about the importance of learning in her organisation and what makes training so integral in a business.

 Hi Cheryl! Tell us a bit about yourself.  Where do you work at and what is your designation?

I graduated from university 2 years ago and joined a foreign bank as an associate. Since then, I have been exposed to different work streams within the bank. I am currently in a Relationship Management role, partnering our clients to identify banking solutions appropriate for their needs.

What kind of training do you do in your company?

An important part of our yearly training diet comprises mandatory compliance modules conducted via the e-channel. These courses are rolled out on a franchise-wide level, and cover both general and specific policy guidelines governing code of conduct, regulatory obligations, and best practices etc. These training requirements could either be driven by policy developments or simply a refresher for all employees.

Separately, we also have a range of product, process and personal development trainings. These are usually tailored to the specific job functions and responsibilities, and are delivered more flexibly across different modes (e.g. classroom training, web-seminar or on-the-job).

“Trainings are created as a true value-add to one’s understanding of the business and performance of one’s specific functions.”

What do you like about the different forms of training that you have?

I like the extensive range of trainings available electronically. For job functions related modules, I think they are well-conducted by the various subject matter experts.

If you could reinvent training in your company to maximise business performance of employees, what would you do?

I don’t think the wheel needs to be re-invented. Rather, optimising training to maximise business performance means to me getting these right :

  1. Trainings are created as a true value-add to one’s understanding of the business and performance of one’s specific functions
  2. Employees are properly educated and savvy in accessing and selecting the relevant modules
  3. Content delivery and structure in the training module must be effective in helping them integrate the take-aways into their daily job
  4. Employees need be motivated to take ownership to chart a personalised, structured training blue-print that empowers them to achieve their professional goals e.g. by making solid evaluations of progress or further areas of improvement within their current training selections.

Other than the training provided by your company, do you actively seek out other ways to improve how you do your job?

Yes, I do. I believe in collaborating and sharing with colleagues across the organisation. This keeps me updated on the latest developments in other parts of the business that may influence any process or regulations in my line of work.

What kind of tech devices do you use?

I carry a smartphone and an ipad.

What is one technology tool that has helped you a lot in learning? 

Lynda comes to mind when I would like to learn something new or pick up a new skill.

4 Things I’ve Learnt from Managing Company Goals with OKRs

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okrIn our previous blog post about OKRs, we talked about the OKR process and how the process of implementation works for an organisation. Epiphany has tried OKRs for 2 quarters and I’ve compiled the thoughts of some people in our company and what they have learnt from setting company, team and individual OKRs. In this first installation, we have Terence, the founding partner of our company share with us his thoughts!

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One of the biggest challenges that a startup or small company is what I like to call operational-paralysis. There’s always something else to do and you end up spending each and every day chasing deadline after deadline. Before you know it, 6 months have passed and you look back at the goals you’ve set for the year and realise that you’re not closer to achieving any of them.

In large corporations, that’s perfectly fine. Most corporations are finely-tuned machines and if every person in the company just focused on doing what is operational, it would still continue to survive. In a startup or small company however, it is important not to lose track of your larger goals. In such an environment, goals also tend to be moving targets. While the beauty of this is a startup’s ability to react quickly to changes in their market and industry, veering away from your plan unknowingly can also be very dangerous.

With this in mind, we started implementing OKRs this year. We’re still in the very early stages of getting it to work well for us but what I love about it is that it provides us with a tangible way to stay focused and evaluate our goals as the year progresses.

For me, the greatest benefit that OKRs provide us with is clarity. Sometimes, the days just seem to fly by, especially when we are caught up in different projects. After awhile, you start to wonder “Why am I doing this particular thing? What do I hope to accomplish? Why does it matter?” OKRs provide a reminder of what we set out to achieve in the first place and it helps us evaluate whether we need to change what we’re doing.

That being said, implementing OKRs have its own set of challenges. The concept is simple enough but on the ground, it does take significant effort to get everyone on board. At Epiphany, we have a set of Company-wide OKRs for the year.
From this, the teams set Annual Team OKRs which are then broken down quarterly. Every individual then sets their own OKRs for the quarter from this.

Here are some learning points from our experience so far.

1) In a fast-paced environment, things change
In our environment, things change quickly and that affects what we do on a weekly basis. Some projects and initiatives weren’t planned at the beginning of the year or quarter even. This means that the Company and Team Annual OKRs can get outdated really quickly, or some Objectives might become de-prioritised.

This means that have to do a better job of keeping the OKRs aligned and communicated across all members of our team.

2) Key results can be really difficult to identify and quantify

okrcartoonFor some of us, our work is very operational and repetitive while for others, work can be more project or goal-based. This makes it difficult to properly identify the right key results and the accompanying metric. We’ve found that some functions are more easily OKR-ed while others find it more challenging. For example, we do Outbound Prospecting of new clients by sending luke-warm emails (pre-researched). It is easy to track the number of emails sent and meetings arranged. But for our Project Managers, many things are deadline-driven and the Key Results read more like a list of tasks, which we are trying to avoid.

3) OKRs have to be part of your culture and everyone must be involved

The OKR process is not supposed to be top-down where managers meet with you to grill you on why you didn’t achieve your objectives. (Read: KPIs) But without this whip, OKRs become an individual’s responsibility to maintain. You cannot have someone constantly nagging at the team to review and evaluate individual OKRs because to me, that defeats the whole purpose. Instead, everyone needs to discover how OKRs help them contribute to the company’s goals. The motivation to review, score and create new OKRs for the quarter has to be driven by the individual, otherwise it becomes another senseless bureaucratic exercise.

4) It takes time to do well

As with everything else, OKRs take time. It isn’t a magical silver bullet that you can implement in a week and expect powerful results. You need time for everyone to get used to it and benefit. But to make it work, you need to have a strong driver in the company to provide support and that extra push to get everyone involved.

I always tell this story about Basecamp, which we are huge fans of. When we first introduced Basecamp, no one wanted any part of using this new software that they’ve never seen before. It took 4 long months of constant nagging and reminders (“Did you put this on Basecamp? Why don’t you put this on Basecamp?”) before everyone started getting comfortable on Basecamp. Now, it’s something we use everyday.

So if you are looking to implement OKRs for your own team or company, take some time to do it well. Don’t give up just because it doesn’t seem to be working perfectly. Instead, keep at it and before you know it, everyone will be OKR-ing.

Part 1: How to Use Google’s OKRs For Your Company

Part 3: Individual OKRs as Cascaded OKRs of the Company

Part 4: Managing OKRs in a Quarter with Moving Targets